Fishing Reports

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Deschutes River - August 27th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 93 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Deschutes River Redside Trout & Summer Steelhead Report
----------------------------------------------------------
Summer Steelhead Report:

August can be, and usually is the toughest month for summer steelhead fishing here, but water temperatures are very favorable and steelhead are moving comfortably through the system without too much trouble.

The catching has improved over the past week simply because there are more fish moving into the lower river.

Numbers over the falls are still light, so for the next couple of weeks I would advise fishing below Sherars Falls.

During direct sunlit hours, you might think about fish faster and deeper water. It’s more oxygenated and because of it’s broken white water chop, it creates a natural shade canopy making steelhead feel more comfortable. So if you have sink tips handy, put one on and give it a try.

----------------------------------------------------------
R E D S I D E  T R O U T:

About the only may flies you’ll see at this point are the PED’s. They hatch from about 4 to 6 PM. The spinner fall happens late morning
and is usually short lived so be prepared to switch flies quickly. It is best to fish below fast water or classic riffles with those patterns.

Late summer hatches start to show signs of change. We are observing our third generation of BWO’s, size 20, Net Spinning Caddis (16’s), and Igloo Cased Caddis (20’s).

During summer months caddis can be, and usually are an abundant food source for trout anytime of the day. The middle of the day can be a little tough, mornings typically better, but its usually the best from 6PM until dark. The reason; toward the end of each day, caddis pupa emerge quickly to the surface to become adults and rapidly escape from the the river to find refuge on stream side vegetation.
At the same time, the caddis that became adults a day or two ago, are returning to the river to lay their eggs.

This is a great time to fish pupa (emerging), and diving (egg laying), caddis because both activities are happening at the same time. If the trout are not responding to your dry patterns, Switch to a down stream swing technique with caddis pupa or diving caddis imitations in riffles. This can really change how your day ends up!

Morning fishing has improved. Midge (size 20 to 22), are very active from 6AM to around 9AM. They also hatch in the evenings. A couple of other really good flies to try in the morning are the spent wing caddis and the rusty spinner. All these flies fish work well in back eddies.
we’ve done better presenting nymphs and larvae deep to get a grab.

Best water types to fish. Back eddies, steep bank runs, riffles, fast water pockets, and down stream of riffles where the water slows and deepens.

Look for foam lines and obvious seams where adults and emerging insects struggle. Spent may flies and caddis also become trapped in this kind of water, and  of course trout instinctively find it easy to capture their daily nourishment as insects endure a rough time breaking free from those swirly seams.

If fishing is slow during the day, try fishing the steep banks, fast water with pockets, and tree lines that over hang the river. Trout go to these areas to hide from bright conditions. You will need to get your fly deep.

The river is very clear. The river level from the reregulating dam is 4,080 CFS (Cubic Feet Per Second), and the average water temperature is 63 degrees.

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, we will be glad to help

ENJOY !!!
Thanks, see ya soon
John Smeraglio
Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop
599 S. Hwy 197, Maupin, OR. 97037
(541) 395-2565
 
Deschutes River - August 15th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Partly cloudy
  • 86 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Deschutes River Redside Trout & Summer Steelhead Report
----------------------------------------------------------
Summer Steelhead Report:

There was some concern regarding what the White River might have done to the Deschutes last Tuesday when a thunder storm moved through the area. It did color up the river for a day, but everything came back in shape nicely.

Steelhead are being caught, “when you find them”. I say that because it seems like the fish are in pods as they move through. You could fish five runs and find fish in only one of those runs. Okay, you could say that about the whole season, but this pattern has been very apparent these past couple of weeks.
 
August can be, and usually is the toughest month for summer steelhead fishing here, but water temperatures are very favorable and steelhead are moving comfortably through the system without too much trouble.

During direct sunlit hours, you might think about fish faster and deeper water. It’s more oxygenated and because of it’s broken white water chop, it creates a natural shade canopy making steelhead feel more comfortable. So if you have sink tips handy, put one on and give it a try.

----------------------------------------------------------
R E D S I D E  T R O U T:

About the only may flies you’ll see at this point are the PED’s. They hatch from about 4 to 6 PM. The spinner fall happens late morning
and is usually short lived so be prepared to switch flies quickly. It is best to fish below fast water or classic riffles with those patterns.

Late summer hatches start to show signs of change. We are observing our third generation of BWO’s, size 20, Net Spinning Caddis (16’s), and Igloo Cased Caddis (20’s).

During summer months caddis can be, and usually are an abundant food source for trout anytime of the day. The middle of the day can be a little tough, mornings typically better, but its usually the best from 6PM until dark. The reason; toward the end of each day, caddis pupa emerge quickly to the surface to become adults and rapidly escape from the the river to find refuge on stream side vegetation.
At the same time, the caddis that became adults a day or two ago, are returning to the river to lay their eggs.

This is a great time to fish pupa (emerging), and diving (egg laying), caddis because both activities are happening at the same time. If the trout are not responding to your dry patterns, Switch to a down stream swing technique with caddis pupa or diving caddis imitations in riffles. This can really change how your day ends up!

Morning fishing has improved. Midge (size 20 to 22), are very active from 6AM to around 9AM. They also hatch in the evenings. A couple of other really good flies to try in the morning are the spent wing caddis and the rusty spinner. All these flies fish work well in back eddies.
we’ve done better presenting nymphs and larvae deep to get a grab.

Best water types to fish. Back eddies, steep bank runs, riffles, fast water pockets, and down stream of riffles where the water slows and deepens.

Look for foam lines and obvious seams where adults and emerging insects struggle. Spent may flies and caddis also become trapped in this kind of water, and  of course trout instinctively find it easy to capture their daily nourishment as insects endure a rough time breaking free from those swirly seams.

If fishing is slow during the day, try fishing the steep banks, fast water with pockets, and tree lines that over hang the river. Trout go to these areas to hide from bright conditions. You will need to get your fly deep.

The river is very clear. The river level from the reregulating dam is 4,080 CFS (Cubic Feet Per Second), and the average water temperature is 63 degrees.

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, we will be glad to help

ENJOY !!!
Thanks, see ya soon
John Smeraglio
Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop
599 S. Hwy 197, Maupin, OR. 97037
(541) 395-2565
 
Deschutes River - August 3rd, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 92 ° F 
  • Fishing: Fair
Deschutes River Redside Trout & Summer Steelhead Report
----------------------------------------------------------
Summer Steelhead Report:

Even though toasty summer temperatures continue, Steelhead are being caught on a fairly regular basis.  Water temperatures in the lower river are favorable and steelhead are moving comfortably through the system without too much trouble. Mornings are the best time to wet your line, but it would be a bad idea to give the evening shade a go.

During midday hours, you might think about getting into faster water. It is oxygenated and because of it’s broken white water chop, it creates a natural shade canopy making steelhead feel more comfortable.

The weather is calling for highs in the low 90’s, I know I know, but it sure beats 106*.
Get hydrated, stay hydrated, come over and fish. Don’t forget, its a great time of year to wade wet.

----------------------------------------------------------
R E D S I D E  T R O U T:

About the only may flies you’ll see at this point are the PED’s. They hatch from about 4 to 6 PM. The spinner fall happens late morning
and is usually short lived so be prepared to switch flies quickly. It is best to fish below fast water or classic riffles with those patterns.

Seeing more caddis now that we are officially into summer. Includes: Net Spinning Caddis (16’s), American Grannom’s (16’s), and Igloo Cased Caddis (20’s).

During summer months caddis can be, and usually are an abundant food source for trout anytime of the day. The middle of the day can be a little tough, mornings typically better, but its usually the best from 6PM until dark. The reason; toward the end of each day, caddis pupa emerge quickly to the surface to become adults and rapidly escape from the the river to find refuge on stream side vegetation.
At the same time, the caddis that became adults a day or two ago, are returning to the river to lay their eggs.

This is a great time to fish pupa (emerging), and diving (egg laying), caddis because both activities are happening at the same time. If the trout are not responding to your dry patterns, Switch to a down stream swing technique with caddis pupa or diving caddis imitations in riffles. This can really change how your day ends up!

Morning fishing has improved. Midge (size 20 to 22), are very active from 6AM to around 9AM. They also hatch in the evenings. A couple of other really good flies to try in the morning are the spent wing caddis and the rusty spinner. All these flies fish work well in back eddies.
we’ve done better presenting nymphs and larvae deep to get a grab.

Best water types to fish. Back eddies, steep bank runs, riffles, fast water pockets, and down stream of riffles where the water slows and deepens.

Look for foam lines and obvious seams where adults and emerging insects struggle. Spent may flies and caddis also become trapped in this kind of water, and  of course trout instinctively find it easy to capture their daily nourishment as insects endure a rough time breaking free from those swirly seams.

If fishing is slow during the day, try fishing the steep banks, fast water with pockets, and tree lines that over hang the river. Trout go to these areas to hide from bright conditions. You will need to get your fly deep.

The river is very clear. The river level from the reregulating dam is 4,080 CFS (Cubic Feet Per Second), and the average water temperature is 54 degrees.

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, we will be glad to help

GET OUT THERE !
Thanks, see ya soon
John Smeraglio
Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop
599 S. Hwy 197, Maupin, OR. 97037
(541) 395-2565
 
Deschutes River - July 17th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 92 ° F 
  • Fishing: Fair
Deschutes River Redside Trout & Summer Steelhead Report
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Summer Steelhead Report:

With the heat wave we’ve been experiencing this week the Deschutes Summer Steelhead have hunkered down due to warm water temps. The lower portions of the river is still holding fish. If you want to give it a shot, mornings are the best time. You might think about getting into faster water that would be more oxygenated, they seem to feel more comfortable with these conditions.
 
The good news is that the weather is going to be cooler by the weekend. they are calling for high temperatures to be in the low 80’s, much better than 108 !

----------------------------------------------------------
R E D S I D E  T R O U T:

About the only may flies you’ll see at this point are the PED’s. They hatch from about 4 to 6 PM. The spinner fall happens late morning
and is usually short lived so be prepared to switch flies quickly. It is best to fish below fast water or classic riffles with those patterns.

Seeing more caddis now that we are officially into summer. Includes: Net Spinning Caddis (16’s), American Grannom’s (16’s), and Igloo Cased Caddis (20’s).

During summer months caddis can be, and usually are an abundant food source for trout anytime of the day. The middle of the day can be a little tough, mornings typically better, but its usually the best from 6PM until dark. The reason; toward the end of each day, caddis pupa emerge quickly to the surface to become adults and rapidly escape from the the river to find refuge on stream side vegetation.
At the same time, the caddis that became adults a day or two ago, are returning to the river to lay their eggs.

This is a great time to fish pupa (emerging), and diving (egg laying), caddis because both activities are happening at the same time. If the trout are not responding to your dry patterns, Switch to a down stream swing technique with caddis pupa or diving caddis imitations in riffles. This can really change how your day ends up!
 
Morning fishing has improved. Midge (size 20 to 22), are very active from 6AM to around 9AM. They also hatch in the evenings. A couple of other really good flies to try in the morning are the spent wing caddis and the rusty spinner. All these flies fish work well in back eddies.
we’ve done better presenting nymphs and larvae deep to get a grab.

Best water types to fish. Back eddies, steep bank runs, riffles, fast water pockets, and down stream of riffles where the water slows and deepens.

Look for foam lines and obvious seams where adults and emerging insects struggle. Spent may flies and caddis also become trapped in this kind of water, and  of course trout instinctively find it easy to capture their daily nourishment as insects endure a rough time breaking free from those swirly seams.

If fishing is slow during the day, try fishing the steep banks, fast water with pockets, and tree lines that over hang the river. Trout go to these areas to hide from bright conditions. You will need to get your fly deep.
 
The river is very clear. The river level from the reregulating dam is 4,080 CFS (Cubic Feet Per Second), and the average water temperature is 54 degrees.

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, we will be glad to help

GET OUT THERE !
Thanks, see ya soon
John Smeraglio
Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop
599 S. Hwy 197, Maupin, OR. 97037
(541) 395-2565
 
Deschutes River - July 5th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 82 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Deschutes River Redside Trout & Summer Steelhead Report
----------------------------------------------------------
Summer Steelhead Report:

The Deschutes Summer Steelhead are showing their shiny lil faces in the lower portions of the river. Meaning approximately the lower 20 miles. A few “hot chromers” have been caught in the Mack’s Canyon
area. Flies that did the trick were the usual suspects, Rusty Bombers, Purple Muddlers, Blue Charm, Night Dancers, Lady Carolyn’s and so forth.

So far numbers moving up the Columbia are good, looks like we should have a normal return of steelhead this season, about 20 thousand. Oh Boy !

Water temps also look good, staying low, keeping fish feeling rested and willing to move freely.
----------------------------------------------------------
R E D S I D E  T R O U T:

PMD’s (16’s), hatch has faded,  PED’s (14’s), and Little Yellow Mays (16’s), have been hatching fairly regularly. Lil Yellow May’s from Noon to 3PM, and PED’s from 4PM to 6PM.

Seeing more caddis now that we are officially into summer. Includes: Net Spinning Caddis (16’s), American Grannom’s (16’s), and Igloo Cased Caddis (20’s).   

During summer months caddis can be, and usually are an abundant food source for trout anytime of the day. The middle of the day can be a little tough, mornings typically better, but its usually the best from 6PM until dark. The reason; toward the end of each day, caddis pupa emerge quickly to the surface to become adults and rapidly escape from the the river to find refuge on stream side vegetation.
At the same time, the caddis that became adults a day or two ago, are returning to the river to lay their eggs.

This is a great time to fish pupa (emerging), and diving (egg laying), caddis because both activities are happening at the same time. If the trout are not responding to your dry patterns, Switch to a down stream swing technique with caddis pupa or diving caddis imitations in riffles. This can really change how your day ends up!
 
Morning fishing has improved. Midge (size 20 to 22), are very active from 6AM to around 9AM. They also hatch in the evenings. A couple of other really good flies to try in the morning are the spent wing caddis and the rusty spinner. All these flies fish work well in back eddies.
we’ve done better presenting nymphs and larvae deep to get a grab.

Best water types to fish. Back eddies, steep bank runs, riffles, fast water pockets, and down stream of riffles where the water slows and deepens.

Look for foam lines and obvious seams where adults and emerging insects struggle. Spent may flies and caddis also become trapped in this kind of water, and  of course trout instinctively find it easy to capture their daily nourishment as insects endure a rough time breaking free from those swirly seams.

If fishing is slow during the day, try fishing the steep banks, fast water with pockets, and tree lines that over hang the river. Trout go to these areas to hide from bright conditions. You will need to get your fly deep.
 
The river is very clear. The river level from the reregulating dam is 4,080 CFS (Cubic Feet Per Second), and the average water temperature is 54 degrees.

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, we will be glad to help

GET OUT THERE !
Thanks, see ya soon
John Smeraglio
Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop
599 S. Hwy 197, Maupin, OR. 97037
(541) 395-2565
 
Deschutes River - June 25th, 2014
  • Recorded:
  • Partly cloudy
  • 68 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good

R E D S I D E  T R O U T:
As we are now in late June, May Flies such as PMD’s (16’s), PED’s (14’s), and Little Yellow Mays (16’s), have been hatching fairly regularly.  PMD’s have been hatching from 11AM to 2PM, PED’s from 4PM to 6PM, and Lil Yellow May’s from Noon to 3PM.

Seeing more caddis now that we are officially into summer. Includes: Net Spinning Caddis (16’s), American Grannom’s (16’s), and Igloo Cased Caddis (20’s).   

During summer months caddis can be, and usually are an abundant food source for trout anytime of the day. The middle of the day can be a little tough, mornings typically better, but its usually the best from 6PM until dark. The reason; toward the end of each day, caddis pupa emerge quickly to the surface to become adults and rapidly escape from the the river to find refuge on stream side vegetation.
At the same time, the caddis that became adults a day or two ago, are returning to the river to lay their eggs.

This is a great time to fish pupa (emerging), and diving (egg laying), caddis because both activities are happening at the same time. If the trout are not responding to your dry patterns, swing some caddis pupa or diving caddis flies in riffles. This can really change how your day ends up!
 
Morning fishing has improved. Midge (size 20 to 22), are very active from 6AM to around 9AM. They also hatch in the evenings. A couple of other really good flies to try in the morning are the spent wing caddis and the rusty spinner. All these flies fish work well in back eddies.
we’ve done better presenting nymphs and larvae deep to get a grab.

Best water types to fish. Back eddies, steep bank runs, riffles, fast water pockets, and down stream of riffles where the water slows and deepens.

Look for foam lines and obvious seams where adults and emerging insects struggle. Spent may flies and caddis also become trapped in this kind of water, and  of course trout instinctively find it easy to capture their daily nourishment as insects endure a rough time breaking free from those swirly seams.

If fishing is slow during the day, try fishing the steep banks, fast water with pockets, and tree lines that over hang the river. Trout go to these areas to hide from bright conditions. You will need to get your fly deep.
 
The river is very clear. The river level from the reregulating dam is 4,080 CFS (Cubic Feet Per Second), and the average water temperature is 54 degrees.
    
We still have a few Winston rods on sale.  These rods have been discontinued by Winston, which means you can get them at a nice discount.

(2) BIIMX 11'6" 6/7wt - Regular Price: $835.00.
SALE PRICE: $585.00!

Take Care, and GET OUT THERE !!!
John Smeraglio
Deschutes Canyon Fly Shop
599 S. Hwy 197, Maupin, OR. 97037
(541) 395-2565