Fishing Reports

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Deschutes River - November 5th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 43 ° F 
  • Fishing: Fair
Check out Nate's latest blog entry at natesflyfishing.com.

Deschutes Summer Steelhaed:
 
At this point steelhead “catching” is fair. The (larger than normal) push of Chinook Salmon are nearing the end of their spawn cycle and the steelhead are settling down. As I mentioned in the last report, any migratory fish, such as salmon or steelhead, will be less likely to bite if they are unsettled and or not resting comfortably in one spot. So, if you don’t mind stepping over a few decaying salmon carcasses as you wade your way down a run, you might find a willing steelhead waiting to grab your fly.

Water conditions are excellent, clarity is very clear and temperatures are ranging from 48 to 50 degrees. White River is also clear and will probably remain that way for the rest of this fall and winter.

A wide variety of Steelhead fly patterns have been used to take fish,
everything from size 2 down to 10. In the low light hours of the morning and evening, black, blue, and purple are the best color choices.
During the day, you can change to Bright Red, Hot Pink, and Orange. I would also recommend sparsely tied natural colored flies. As clear as the water is, subdued flies sometimes will do the trick.

At these water temperatures, dry line and sink tip techniques both work well, given the water depth and time of day. Its very important to keep moving through the run you’re fishing, remember, when water is clear, fish can see very well, in most cases, easily 30 to 40 feet. Your not helping your odds by taking 1 or 2 small steps after each cast & swing. You should be taking 3 to 5 steps after each presentation.

Okay, you’re all set. Get in your rig, get over here, and enjoy these beautiful days of fall!
    Thanks,
          John Smeraglio

We have open dates for guided trips for this month.
Give us a call and see what date works best for you!   
(541) 395-2565

Trout: 
Deschutes River Redside Trout Report:

Now that fall is here, trout fshing has changed for the better. Mornings and evenings are the better times to fish, but as the light is now lower in the sky and with the new cycles of hatches getting under way, midday fishing should not be over looked. 
     
Stick mostly with Caddis dries and wets, Blue Wing Olives dries and wets, Mohagany dun emergers and dries, and October Caddis Pupa. Concentrate your efforts in the riffles, fast water pockets and steep bank runs. In the mornings, back eddies can be a lot of fun with some small midge pupa patterns. Extend your tippet lengths and keep the fly drifting as long as you can, it will pay off.

Make sure you have: Igloo Case Building Caddis, (20’s) Net Spinning Caddis Adults, Larva, and pupa, (16’s) BWO’S Size (20) October Caddis Pups, (8). Fish midge in sizes (18’s) (20’s) (22’s) in the slow water, fishing these can sometimes save the day.

Take a few moments in the mornings to study and look for rising or sipping trout in back eddies and slack water, just inside a current edge that forms a food gathering seam.  The fish will key on certain bug behavior, try a natural drift with no drag, a drift with a little bit of movement added to your presentation, and then swing wets, emergers, and caddis pupas. Use a shock loop for this down stream presentation so you don’t get broken off on the take.  Have fun !!! 

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, John Smeraglio, Nate Morris, or Joe Ringo, ...             We’d be glad to help!
                         (541) 395-2565,   
 
Deschutes River - October 29th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly sunny
  • 56 ° F 
  • Fishing: Fair
Check out Nate's latest blog entry at natesflyfishing.com.

Deschutes Summer Steelhaed:

Steelhead “catching” on the Deschutes River it has been slow to spotty at best. The fish are here, but still seem to be a little unsettled, meaning they don’t rest long enough in one spot to get protective or aggressive in that spot.

Moving, traveling, or unsettled steelhead are far less responsive to presented flies, and in most cases will actually move out of the way of objects, flies, lures, river debris, etc... to continue to move up stream.  Therefore, your results become better when your fly drifts by fish that have established a resting place.

Steelhead have spread through the Maupin area, and are as far up as Trout Creek. Still plenty of steelhead below Sherars Falls, and from the mouth up to Macks Canyon. The fishing below Macks has also slowed down. A good day woulkd be 1 maybe 2 steelhead hook-ups. Don't worry, the catching can improve again without any notice. So keep after-em, remember, it only takes one cast to change your day! 

Water temperatures are great! Mid fifties and water is clear. There are “no issues” with White River coloring up the Deschutes. The White R. has a slight glacial tinge to it, but thats normal.

For patterns, use your favorites, there is no one thing that is glaringly better than anything else. Skating flies is always one of the more exciting ways to catch steelhead on the Deschutes, so if you haven’t experienced this yet, there is no reason not to try it.

We have open dates for guided trips for this month and November. Give us a call and see what date works best for you!    (541) 395-2565

Trout: 
Deschutes River Redside Trout Report:

Now that fall is here, trout fshing has changed for the better. Mornings and evenings are the better times to fish, but as the light is now lower in the sky and with the new cycles of hatches getting under way, midday fishing should not be over looked. 
     
Stick mostly with Caddis dries and wets, Blue Wing Olives dries and wets, Mohagany dun emergers and dries, and October Caddis Pupa. Concentrate your efforts in the riffles, fast water pockets and steep bank runs. In the mornings, back eddies can be a lot of fun with some small midge pupa patterns. Extend your tippet lengths and keep the fly drifting as long as you can, it will pay off.

Make sure you have: Igloo Case Building Caddis, (20’s) Net Spinning Caddis Adults, Larva, and pupa, (16’s) BWO’S Size (20) October Caddis Pups, (8). Fish midge in sizes (18’s) (20’s) (22’s) in the slow water, fishing these can sometimes save the day.

Take a few moments in the mornings to study and look for rising or sipping trout in back eddies and slack water, just inside a current edge that forms a food gathering seam.  The fish will key on certain bug behavior, try a natural drift with no drag, a drift with a little bit of movement added to your presentation, and then swing wets, emergers, and caddis pupas. Use a shock loop for this down stream presentation so you don’t get broken off on the take.  Have fun !!! 

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, John Smeraglio, Nate Morris, or Joe Ringo, ...             We’d be glad to help!
                         (541) 395-2565,   
 
Deschutes River - October 13th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Mostly cloudy
  • 65 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Check out Nate's latest blog entry at natesflyfishing.com.

Deschutes Summer Steelhaed:

Steelhead “catching” on the Deschutes River is finally improving. For about  two weeks or so it has been slow to spotty at best. The fish are here, they just seem to be a little unsettled, meaning they don’t rest long enough in one spot to get protective or aggressive in that spot. Moving, traveling, or unsettled steelhead are far less responsive to presented flies, and in most cases will actually move out of the way of objects, flies, lures, river debris, etc... to continue to move up stream.  Therefore, your results become better when your fly drifts by fish that have established a resting place.

Steelhead have spread through the Maupin area, and are as far up as Trout Creek. Still plenty of steelhead below Sherars Falls, and from the mouth up to Macks Canyon. The fishing below Macks is still good. 

Water temperatures are great! Mid fifties and water is clear. There are “no issues” with White River coloring up the Deschutes. The White R. has a slight glacial tinge to it, but thats normal.

For patterns, use your favorites, there is no one thing that is glaringly better than anything else. Skating flies is always one of the more exciting ways to catch steelhead on the Deschutes, so if you haven’t experienced this yet, there is no reason not to try it.

We have open dates for guided trips for this month and November. Give us a call and see what date works best for you!    (541) 395-2565

Trout: 
Deschutes River Redside Trout Report:

Now that fall is here, trout fshing has changed for the better. Mornings and evenings are the better times to fish, but as the light is now lower in the sky and with the new cycles of hatches getting under way, midday fishing should not be over looked. 
     
Stick mostly with Caddis dries and wets, Blue Wing Olives dries and wets, Mohagany dun emergers and dries, and October Caddis Pupa. Concentrate your efforts in the riffles, fast water pockets and steep bank runs. In the mornings, back eddies can be a lot of fun with some small midge pupa patterns. Extend your tippet lengths and keep the fly drifting as long as you can, it will pay off.

Make sure you have: Igloo Case Building Caddis, (20’s) Net Spinning Caddis Adults, Larva, and pupa, (16’s) BWO’S Size (20) October Caddis Pups, (8). Fish midge in sizes (18’s) (20’s) (22’s) in the slow water, fishing these can sometimes save the day.

Take a few moments in the mornings to study and look for rising or sipping trout in back eddies and slack water, just inside a current edge that forms a food gathering seam.  The fish will key on certain bug behavior, try a natural drift with no drag, a drift with a little bit of movement added to your presentation, and then swing wets, emergers, and caddis pupas. Use a shock loop for this down stream presentation so you don’t get broken off on the take.  Have fun !!! 

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, John Smeraglio, Nate Morris, or Joe Ringo, ...             We’d be glad to help!
                         (541) 395-2565,   
 
Deschutes River - October 1st, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Partly cloudy
  • 66 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Check out Nate's latest blog entry at natesflyfishing.com.

Steelhead:
The Summer Steelhead in the Deschutes River have moved into the Maupin area, and as far up as the Care Takers place above the locked gate. Plenty of steelhead below Sherars Falls, and from the mouth up to Macks Canyon is still fishing well.  Water temperatures are great! Mid fifties and water is clear. There are “no issues” with White River coloring up the Deschutes. The White R. has a slight glacial tinge to it, but thats normal.

For patterns, use your favorites, there is no one thing that is glaringly better than anything else. Skating flies is always one of the more exciting ways to catch steelhead on the Deschutes, so if you haven’t experienced this yet, there is no reason not to try it.

We have open dates for guided trips for this month and November. Give us a call and see what date works best for you!    (541) 395-2565       

Trout: 
Deschutes River Redside Trout Report:

Now that fall is here, trout fshing has changed for the better. Mornings and evenings are the better times to fish, but as the light is now lower in the sky and with the new cycles of hatches getting under way, midday fishing should not be over looked. 
     
Stick mostly with Caddis dries and wets, Blue Wing Olives dries and wets, Mohagany dun emergers and dries, and October Caddis Pupa. Concentrate your efforts in the riffles, fast water pockets and steep bank runs. In the mornings, back eddies can be a lot of fun with some small midge pupa patterns. Extend your tippet lengths and keep the fly drifting as long as you can, it will pay off.

Make sure you have: Igloo Case Building Caddis, (20’s) Net Spinning Caddis Adults, Larva, and pupa, (16’s) BWO’S Size (20) October Caddis Pups, (8). Fish midge in sizes (18’s) (20’s) (22’s) in the slow water, fishing these can sometimes save the day.

Take a few moments in the mornings to study and look for rising or sipping trout in back eddies and slack water, just inside a current edge that forms a food gathering seam.  The fish will key on certain bug behavior, try a natural drift with no drag, a drift with a little bit of movement added to your presentation, and then swing wets, emergers, and caddis pupas. Use a shock loop for this down stream presentation so you don’t get broken off on the take.  Have fun !!! 

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, John Smeraglio, Nate Morris, or Joe Ringo, ...             We’d be glad to help!
                         (541) 395-2565,   
 
Deschutes River - September 23rd, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 80 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
Check out Nate's latest blog entry at natesflyfishing.com.

Steelhead:
Deschutes Summer Steelhaed:

Numbers of steelhead are picking up above Sherars, fishing should be good all the way to South Junction. Fishing seems to be either hot or cold, we have had lots of multiple fish days, conversely, we've also had some skunks in there. Results like that can drive you crazy, and then you remember you are steelhead fishing. Keep at it! Keep fishing! The pay-off is worth it!

Trout:
Deschutes River Redside Trout Report:

Stick mostly with Caddis dries and wets, but keep an eye out for BWO's and Mahogony duns. Concentrate your efforts in the riffles, fast water pockets and steep bank runs. In the mornings, back eddies can be a lot of fun with some small midge pupa patterns. Extend your tippet lengths and keep the fly drifting as long as you can, it will pay off.

Make sure you have: Igloo Case Building Caddis, (20’s) Net Spinning Caddis Adults, Larva, and pupa, (16’s) BWO’S Size (20) Fish midge in sizes (18’s) (20’s) (22’s) in the slow water, fishing these can sometimes save the day.

Take a few moments in the mornings to study and look for rising or sipping trout in back eddies and slack water, just inside a current edge that forms a food gathering seam. Nothing there? No sweat, head for the tree lines and work your way up stream at a good pace. Of course one of the best water types to be in the morning and evening in August is riffles. The fish will key on certain bug behavior, try a natural drift with no drag, a drift with a little bit of movement added to your presentation, and then swing wets, emergers, and caddis pupas. Use a shock loop for this down stream presentation so you don’t get broken off on the take. Have fun !!!

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, John Smeraglio, Nate Morris, or Joe Ringo, ... We’d be glad to help!
(541) 395-2565,    
 
Deschutes River - August 26th, 2011
  • Recorded:
  • Sunny
  • 80 ° F 
  • Fishing: Good
SEPTEMBER 23RD...sorry we are having problems changing our date.

Steelhead:
Deschutes Summer Steelhaed:

Numbers of steelhead are picking up above Sherars, fishing should be good all the way to South Junction. Fishing seems to be either hot or cold, we have had lots of multiple fish days, conversely, we've also had some skunks in there. Results like that can drive you crazy, and then you remember you are steelhead fishing. Keep at it! Keep fishing! The pay-off is worth it!

Trout: 
Deschutes River Redside Trout Report:
     
Stick mostly with Caddis dries and wets, but keep an eye out for BWO's and Mahogony duns. Concentrate your efforts in the riffles, fast water pockets and steep bank runs. In the mornings, back eddies can be a lot of fun with some small midge pupa patterns. Extend your tippet lengths and keep the fly drifting as long as you can, it will pay off.

Make sure you have: Igloo Case Building Caddis, (20’s) Net Spinning Caddis Adults, Larva, and pupa, (16’s) BWO’S Size (20) Fish midge in sizes (18’s) (20’s) (22’s) in the slow water, fishing these can sometimes save the day.

Take a few moments in the mornings to study and look for rising or sipping trout in back eddies and slack water, just inside a current edge that forms a food gathering seam. Nothing there? No sweat, head for the tree lines and work your way up stream at a good pace. Of course one of the best water types to be in the morning and evening in August is riffles. The fish will key on certain bug behavior, try a natural drift with no drag, a drift with a little bit of movement added to your presentation, and then swing wets, emergers, and caddis pupas. Use a shock loop for this down stream presentation so you don’t get broken off on the take.  Have fun !!! 

If you have Q’s, Please don’t hesitate to call, John Smeraglio, Nate Morris, or Joe Ringo, ...             We’d be glad to help!
                         (541) 395-2565,    

 

 
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